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Frequent Questions

What is the cost of outpatient treatment at BrightView?

The fees are based on individual clinical needs and services provided. BrightView accepts Medicaid and most other forms of insurance. Please contact one of our patient service representatives by phone to inquire further about specific fees associated with our programs.

What insurance plans does BrightView accept?

Currently, BrightView accepts Aetna, Anthem, CareSource, HealthSpan, Molina, Paramount, and United Healthcare. Check this webpage periodically for updates to BrightView’s accepted plans. We are aggressively working to become an in-network provider with all of the major insurers in Ohio.

Do you follow a 12-step model?

While it is not a mandatory requirement for our program, we strongly encourage patients to participate in a 12-step group or other self-help group. However, all patients are required to participate in individual and/or group psychotherapy that consists of more clinical therapy than 12-step meetings or self-help groups provide.

Is BrightView an inpatient program?

No. BrightView only provides outpatient treatment programs.

What does outpatient treatment involve?

BrightView outpatient programs for addiction to illicit drugs and prescription drugs are based on the educational LIVING IN BALANCE matrix developed by Hazelden and other evidenced based materials. This unique approach is most effective in a group setting with others who are also on the road to recovery. Our Outpatient Treatment Program usually consists of individual, group, and family therapy sessions along with a monthly physician visit. The length of the program is individualized according to the personal needs of the patient. BrightView’s Intensive Outpatient Program usually consists of 9 hours of group therapy per week for 8 to 14 weeks. It also includes individual therapy, family sessions, and monthly physician visits.

What is BrightView’s program like?

At BrightView, we attempt to make the patient feel safe and comfortable in group and avoid confrontational or adversarial treatment. We do our best to provide an energetic, supportive, and healing environment for our patients and their families.

What is addiction medicine and what makes it different from other fields of practice?

Addiction medicine is an interdisciplinary practice specializing in the identification and treatment of persons whose disorders are caused or exacerbated by the use of addictive substances. Such substances have the unique property of promoting continued use in a compulsive manner despite adverse consequences to the user. In our society, the most notable offending substances are nicotine, alcohol, opiates, stimulant drugs, and marijuana. Services typically offered by specialists in addiction medicine include: • Assessment of substance use disorders • Management of withdrawal • Consultation with other physicians concerning identification, intervention, and management of patients in hospital or office practice whose disorders are directly linked to use of these substances • Facilitation of patient engagement in treatment programs designed to reduce the progression of the patient’s substance-related problems • Development of outcomes-based treatment programs for such patients • Environmental modifications so as to alter the social, behavioral, and pharmacologic inputs that support the continuation of substance use and dependence • Research into the genetic and neuro-biologic aspects of addiction, with the ultimate goal of developing improved methods of prevention, early intervention, and treatment (behavioral and pharmacologic) of addictive disorders

Can a person come for detox and not participate in the counseling portion of BrightView’s program?

We have found that when detox is performed without the individual participating in a counseling program that the rate of recurrence is high. In our opinion, the probability of success is greatly improved by taking part in a comprehensive treatment program that provides counseling. So, no, BrightView does not offer detoxification as a stand-alone service.

What is buprenorphine (suboxone)?

Buprenorphine is one of three medications commonly used to treat opioid addiction. The other two are methadone and naltrexone. Cost varies for the different medications. You may need to take this into account when considering your treatment options. The person who takes buprenorphine feels normal, not high. However, the brain thinks it is receiving the problem opioid, so withdrawal symptoms are reduced. Buprenorphine also diminishes cravings. If cravings continue to be a problem, your doctor will adjust your medication to help reduce them. You take buprenorphine as a pill that dissolves under the tongue. You do NOT chew or swallow it. There are two forms. Suboxone® contains buprenorphine plus another medication called naloxone. The naloxone is added to prevent abuse—it brings on withdrawal in people who abuse buprenorphine by injecting it. Subutex® contains only buprenorphine. This form is prescribed if you should not take naloxone for any reason, such as if you are allergic to it or are pregnant. The pill is taken once a day. Over time, the dose interval may stay at once a day or change to every other day.

Do you provide buprenorphine (suboxone) without requiring the patient to participate in counseling?

No, BrightView does not provide buprenorphine to a patient unless they are willing to engage in one of our comprehensive treatment programs.

I am addicted to pain pills, but I have pain. What can I do?

The BrightView staff works directly with some of the best pain management specialists in the region. Our staff will collaborate with those specialists to determine an approach to managing your pain while trying to reduce and eventually eliminate your use of pain pills.

Are patients required to visit BrightView each day to receive their daily prescription of buprenorphine (suboxone)?

No. Buprenorphine (suboxone) is not controlled in the same manner as methadone because it has a lower potential for abuse and is less dangerous. Prescriptions are given to patients based on their ongoing success and BrightView can supply the patient with enough medication for days or even weeks at a time.

Who can prescribe buprenorphine (suboxone)?

Only qualified doctors with the necessary DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) identification numbers are able to start in-office treatment and provide prescriptions for ongoing medication. CSAT (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment) maintains a database to help patients locate qualified physicians.

How is buprenorphine (suboxone) supplied?

Suboxone comes in 2 mg and 8 mg strengths as sublingual (placed under the tongue to dissolve) tablets.

Where can patients get buprenorphine (suboxone)?

Suboxone is available in most commercial pharmacies including most Walgreens, CVS, and Kroger locations.

Where can I go for more information on buprenorphine (suboxone)?

Go to: http://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/treatment/buprenorphine

Does BrightView treat adolescents?

Yes. However, we do not treat patients under the age of 16. In addition, addiction affects families as a whole and children may participate in family therapy with adult patients when appropriate.