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A plan to let patients compare addiction treatment programs

Families should be able to compare and find addiction recovery providers the same way shoppers compare cars or refrigerators, according to Thomas McClellan.

“I want to get the thing, the service, the good that has the highest number of quality features at the most reasonable price,” said McClellan, who founded the Treatment Research Institute in Philadelphia after a long career in addiction medicine.

McClellan says his institute helped Utah compare providers and right now several other states are doing it as well. He made a prediction at the conference of New Jersey Association of Mental Health and Addiction Agencies.

“This kind of consumer involvement is going to happen because it has to,” he said.

“People have to be accountable for treatment and results so that people will get better,” said New Jersey Association of Mental Health and Addiction Agencies, President and CEO, Debra Wentz.

McClellan’s lectures generated chuckles from the audience while he used the Surgeon General’s 2016 “Facing Addiction in America” report as a basis for a wake-up call.

“You might want to write this down: they do not have a 30-day diabetes program,” he said.

McClellan says providers should approach addiction the same way primary care doctors treat chronic diseases like asthma or hypertension.

Link to full article here, originally posted on:

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Dr. Ryan to speak at National RX Summit in Atlanta

BrightView’s Dr. Shawn Ryan is presenting at this year’s Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta April 22-25th where professionals from across the country will come together to address the opioid epidemic. The Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit is where solutions are formulated, stakeholders from Federal to family convene, and change begins. It is the annual gathering for stakeholders to discuss what’s working in prevention and treatment. Notable speakers in past years have included President Barack Obama in 2016, Congressmen Patrick Kennedy and Newt Gingrich in 2017, and President Bill Clinton and Counselor to the President, Kellyanne Conway in 2018. Be part of the international discussion on addressing the opioid crisis by attending the 2019 Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta.

Dr. Ryan will present on Wednesday, April 24th from 8:15am-9:30am on the topic of Buprenorphine: An innovative tool for managing opioid use disorders in emergency departments.

A synopsis of the presentation is as follows:

Due to the lack of adequate treatment resources in our communities, patients are increasingly visiting the emergency department (ED) seeking treatment services for opioid use disorder (OUD). When left untreated, OUD is a disease that can have devastating consequences and is often fatal. Thus, it is critical that emergency clinicians are equipped with tools to manage patients with opioid use disorder. The use of medications, such as buprenorphine, has proven to be an effective intervention for OUD, substantially reducing mortality and increasing retention in treatment. In this session, members of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will discuss the barriers to increasing access to this vital medication in EDs and how to leverage an innovative tool, a web/smart phone app, to help clinicians manage patients with OUD in the ED and save lives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe how the web/smart phone app clarifies the indications and contradictions for buprenorphine administration (and prescribing) in the ED.
  • Explain how using the web/smart phone app helps EDs to more safely discharge patients, improving the linkage to treatment.
  • Describe how the web/smart phone app clarifies rules and regulations related to buprenorphine, administration and prescribing in the ED, thus reducing barriers to initiation of medications for addiction treatment in the United States.

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Holding Hands

BrightView is part of a regional wide app connecting people in recovery

A new app will help connect Cincinnati area and Northern Kentucky people in recovery who want to help others with addiction starting Monday..

PeerStrong is designed to build a network for current and potential peer supporters, who will then be able to access leads to social services, treatment providers and programs they can use to get certified to be an official peer recovery supporter.

That’s just the first phase. If it’s successful, there will be more: PeerStrong will be upgraded to make virtual matches between peer supporters and people seeking treatment for addiction.

Click here to download the app.

To continue reading the full article please click here, originally posted on:

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Article written by Terry DeMio

Gavel and pills

Op-ed: The opioid epidemic’s untold story — enormous strain on courts

Last year, more Americans died of opioid overdoses than of many cancers, gunshot wounds, or even car crashes. In fact, by at least one metric, the epidemic is more dire for Americans than was the Vietnam War: while an average of 11 Americans died per day during the 14 years the U.S. was involved in Vietnam, nearly 120 Americans died per day of opioid overdoses in 2018 alone.

As families write obituaries, death notices are printed, and flowers are delivered to grieving loved ones, an important part of the story has gone largely untold. At some point, if they survive, most opioid abusers end up in court. Perhaps they have been arrested for stealing to feed their habits or perhaps an agency has deemed them unfit parents. Whatever the reason, one fact remains: the state court justice system is now the primary referral source for addiction treatment in the country.

This reality has put enormous strain on our nation’s state courts, many of which have been overwhelmed by growing dockets and shrinking resources. In a recent survey of chief justices and state court administrators, 55 percent ranked the opioid epidemic’s impact on the courts as severe. The survey results are unsurprising, given the complexity of opioid cases: it takes an enormous amount of time to figure out what’s best for people who are addicted, how to care for their children, and what resources are available for them. And those who are placed in a treatment program with court oversight may remain involved with the court for years.

Link to full article here, originally posted on:

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The silver lining of America’s opioid tragedy

The opioid addiction sweeping America is devastating. It kills around 60,000 people annually, far more than the number who die in traffic accidents or from gun violence. It has contributed to three years of falling American life expectancy—the first such sustained fall since the first world war. But there is one small but significant silver lining: organ donations. In 2017 one in eight deceased organ donors in America died from an overdose, compared to one in 100 in 2000.

Fatal drug overdoses usually kill by starving the brain of oxygen. As far as organ donation is concerned, brain death is the more useful kind. That is because it takes some time for the heart to register the loss of brain function and stop beating—at which point organs begin to deteriorate rapidly. Moreover, the opioid epidemic has been concentrated among younger middle-class people, who are in otherwise good overall health. “These are extremely high-quality organs,” says Dorry Segev, a transplant surgeon at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore.

Link to full article here, originally posted on:

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Toledo Ohio Skyline

BrightView Opens New Treatment Center in Greater Toledo April 8, 2019

BrightView Opens New Treatment Center in Greater Toledo April 8, 2019;

Eighth location brings proven outpatient addiction treatment to the region.

BrightView provides comprehensive addiction treatment programs to those who need help the most. Since opening in 2015, BrightView has expanded throughout Ohio, recently opening in Toledo. All eight of its locations provide evidence-based addiction medicine, individual and group counseling, and support services that help patients achieve lasting recovery.

BrightView’s newest clinic is located at 1655 Holland Road Maumee, OH 43537, and provides accessible, discreet outpatient addiction treatment to the region. BrightView clinicians and counselors serve patients six days a week and provide ongoing support that addresses the whole person. BrightView is focused on treating addiction through biological, sociological, and psychological means.

Lasting healing can only be achieved when patients feel respected in an uplifting environment.  The organization takes a positive approach to treating the disease of addiction and engaging those afflicted by it. Through a combination of medication-assisted treatment (MAT), counseling, and social support, long-term recovery is possible.  All treatment programs are personalized to each patient’s history and the severity of their disease.

Amy Parker, a Peer Recovery Specialist with BrightView said,

“As someone who has been in recovery for seven years, I can personally speak to the lasting effectiveness of the programs that BrightView offers, and I am excited to help bring them to Toledo. As a Peer Recovery Support Specialist, I have the opportunity to work directly with patients and to encourage and support their journey of recovery. We understand where they have been and the immense challenges that they face because we have been there before. BrightView offers hope and a healthy future in an understanding and respectful environment.”

Providing this life-saving care will stem the growing epidemic on a local level. Overdose deaths have continued on a dangerous trajectory in the Toledo area as reported in US News and World Report (November 2018).

The analysis by the Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health, a collaboration between Ohio University and the University of Toledo, also found that nearly 80% of unintentional overdose deaths involving a psychostimulant included an opioid as well, and that more than 70% involved the deadly synthetic opioid fentanyl.

“We are poised to work together to save lives and bring more hope to the Toledo area by treating addiction compassionately and effectively,” Dr. Shawn Ryan, Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of BrightView, said, “We are certain that as we work with partners in the community, we will see improvements one life, one patient at a time, which will result in positive trends. This is an outstanding community, and we look forward to helping people here achieve lasting recovery.”

People or families seeking help can call BrightView at 833-510-HELP (4357) 24-hours per day, 7 days per week.  Treatment often begins the same day or next day.  Recovery starts immediately, with a full exam and assessment performed by a qualified medical staff.  Medication is used to make patients feel better quickly; medical, social, and psychological needs are all addressed. The outpatient model offers treatment that seamlessly works into day-to-day life and is not disruptive to work and family schedules. BrightView Accepts Medicaid, Medicare, and all major insurances.

About BrightView

Since opening in 2015, BrightView provides outpatient treatment centers spanning Ohio for substance use disorder. This includes Cincinnati, Chillicothe, Dayton, Batavia, Fairfield, Columbus, and now Toledo. Locations in Springfield, Canton, and Akron will open in the next few months. Patients can call 833-510-HELP 24-hours per day to schedule an appointment or assessment at any BrightView location.

The organization’s effective treatment approach includes medication assisted treatment (MAT), individual counseling, group therapy, social service support, as well as work on co-occurring disorders.  Locations are generally able to dispense medication on-site, which makes treatment easy and convenient for patients. The treatment plan works seamlessly with daily life commitments. All insurances and Medicaid and Medicare are accepted.

BrightView’s compassionate and professional staff create an accessible and welcoming environment for both physical and emotional healing. BrightView is about respect for each patient, positive reinforcement, and long-term wellness. To learn more, please visit www.BrightViewHealth.com.

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This Groundbreaking Letter From Dozens of Sheriffs and DAs Calls for MAT in Jails

Lack of access to methadone and buprenorphine, life saving opioid use disorder medications, for vulnerable incarcerated populations has long been a stain on the US criminal justice system.

On April 3, a groundbreaking open letter—signed by 58 current or former elected sheriffs, district attorneys and other law enforcement and criminal justice officials and leaders from across the US—called for this situation to end in jails and prisons, and for naloxone distribution on release.

Incarcerated populations are hugely important in the context of addressing the opioid-involved overdose crisis. A 2018 CDC report indicated that in around 10 percent of overdose deaths, there was evidence of the person being released from an institutional setting in the month prior.

Law enforcement voices have the potential to be powerful influences on mainstream and government opinion. The letter was organized by Fair and Just Prosecution and the Law Enforcement Action Partnership (LEAP)*, two pro-reform advocacy groups.

Link to full article here, originally posted on:

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Columbus Ohio

BrightView Opens New Center in Columbus: Seventh location brings proven outpatient addiction treatment to the region.

BrightView Opens New Center in Columbus April 8, 2019;

Seventh location brings proven outpatient addiction treatment to the region.

— FOR Immediate Release —

Columbus, Ohio

Media Contact: Jennifer Mooney at  Jennifer.mooney@TheMooneyGroup.net

BrightView provides comprehensive addiction treatment programs to those who need help the most. Since opening in 2015, BrightView has expanded throughout Ohio, recently opening in Columbus. All seven of its locations provide evidence-based addiction medicine, individual and group counseling, and support services that help patients transition from active addiction into lasting recovery.

BrightView’s newest clinic is located at 4660 Roberts Road, 43228 and provides accessible, discreet outpatient addiction treatment to the region. BrightView clinicians and counselors serve patients in person six days a week and provide ongoing support that addresses the whole person.  BrightView is focused on treating addiction through biological, sociological, and psychological means.

Lasting healing can only be achieved when patients feel respected in an uplifting environment.  The organization takes a positive approach to treating the disease of addiction and engaging those afflicted by it. Through a combination of medication-assisted treatment (MAT), counseling, and social support, long-term recovery is possible.  All treatment programs are personalized to each patient’s history and the severity of their disease.

Amy Parker, a Peer Recovery Specialist with BrightView said,

“As someone who has been in recovery for seven years, I can speak to the lasting effectiveness of the programs that BrightView offers and I am excited to help bring them to Columbus. As a Peer Recovery Support Specialist, I have the opportunity to work directly with patients and to encourage and support their journey of recovery. We understand where they have been and the immense challenges that they face because we have been there before. BrightView offers hope and a healthy future in an understanding and respectful environment.”

Providing this life-saving care will help to stem the growing epidemic on a local level. Overdose deaths have unfortunately continued on a dangerous trajectory in the Columbus area as reported in The Columbus Dispatch (November 2018).

With an average toll amounting to 14 deaths each day, Ohio remains saddled with the nation’s second-highest rate of drug overdose deaths.  Only in West Virginia did people die from drugs at a faster pace than in Ohio last year, according to new federal figures.

Ohio — which has spent $1 billion a year combating the opioid epidemic — was one of 20 states and the District of Columbia where the death toll topped the national average.

“We are poised to work together to save lives and bring more hope to the Columbus area by treating addiction compassionately,” Dr. Shawn Ryan, Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of BrightView, said, “We are certain that as we work with partners in the community, we will see improvements one life, one patient at a time, which will result in positive  trends. This is an outstanding community, and we look forward to helping people here achieve lasting recovery.”

People or families seeking help can call BrightView at 833-510-HELP (4357) 24-hours per day, 7 days per week.  Treatment often begins the same day or next day.  Recovery starts immediately, with a full exam and assessment performed by a qualified medical staff.  Medication is used to make patients feel better quickly; medical, social, and psychological needs are all addressed. The outpatient model offers treatment that seamlessly works into day-to-day life and is not disruptive to work and family schedules. BrightView Accepts Medicaid, Medicare, and all major insurances.

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About BrightView

Opening in 2015, BrightView provides outpatient treatment centers spanning Ohio for substance use disorder.  This includes Cincinnati, Chillicothe, Dayton, Batavia, Fairfield, Columbus, and Toledo. Locations in Springfield, Canton, and Akron will open in the next few months to expand access to care.  Patients can call 833-510-HELP 24-hours per day to schedule an appointment or assessment at any BrightView location.

The organization’s effective treatment approach includes medication assisted treatment (MAT), individual counseling, group therapy, social service support, as well as work on co-occurring disorders.  Locations are generally able to dispense medication on-site, which makes treatment easy and convenient for patients. The treatment plan works seamlessly with daily life commitments. All insurances and Medicaid and Medicare are accepted.

BrightView’s compassionate and professional staff create an accessible and welcoming environment for both physical and emotional healing. BrightView is about respect for each patient, positive reinforcement, and long-term wellness. To learn more, please visit www.BrightViewHealth.com

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Opioid Epidemic: 21st Century Thinking Needed To Solve A 21st Century Problem

In 2017, the United States government declared the epidemic of opioid abuse and overdose a national emergency. Since then, the crisis has seized the attention of media, politicians, physicians, and scientists who have bandied about numerous explanations and potential solutions to the problem.

Many states have implemented drastic opioid restrictions, manufacturers and pharmaceutical wholesale vendors have limited supply, pain clinics have shut down and doctors willing to prescribe opioids are fewer and further between. Yet, the problem persists across large swaths of the country and the number of people delivering innovative solutions is dwindling. However, the battle is not lost. The solutions we seek may be right under our noses.

To address the problem, we must first understand it. The problem is not simply access to opioid prescriptions, but rather how we as a society view and treat pain. So long as there is a demand for pain management, there will be a risk of addiction to opioids. According to a 2017 CDC study, it only takes five days of even a low dose opioid to develop a dependency on the drug. After major surgeries and severe injuries, patients can suffer from recovery pain for weeks or months, creating significant risk of long-term addiction. So how do we prevent or lower risk of addiction when the need for pain management for both acute and chronic conditions is so great? In a special report from the New England Journal of Medicine, solutions reside in three main categories: overdose reversal interventions, treatments for opioid addiction, and non-addictive pain treatments.

Link to full article here, originally posted on:
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Samples of Blood and Bodily Fluids

Scientists join the fray in fight against US opioid epidemic

Chemists and engineers are turning their attention to trying to alleviate some of the suffering caused by the opioid epidemic ravaging the US, driven by an unprecedented surge in deaths from fentanyl and other synthetic opiates.

Overall, opioid-related deaths in the US spiked from approximately 18,500 in 2007 to more than 47,000 a decade later, according to the US National Institutes of Health. Overdose deaths linked to synthetic opioids in the country rose more than 45% between 2016 and 2017, the country’s Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates. A new CDC report identifies fentanyl as the deadliest drug in the country, causing more than 18,300 deaths in 2016.

Synthetic opioids such as fentanyl are very long-lasting compared with traditional narcotics of abuse such as morphine and heroine. Doses of the current antidotes have not always been potent enough to fully counter the effects of fentanyl, according to Saadyah Averick from the Allegheny Health Network Research Institute in Pennsylvania. He discussed his work to develop single-dose, longer-lasting opioid antidotes using polymer nanoparticles at the American Chemical Society’s spring meeting in Orlando, Florida on 1 April.

Link to full article here, originally posted on:

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